Meg Worley Assistant Professor of Writing and Rhetoric Colgate University

Colgate Directory




FACULTY DETAIL    < BACK TO RESULTS
Meg Worley

Meg Worley

Assistant Professor of Writing and Rhetoric
Writing and Rhetoric, 213A Lathrop Hall
p 315-228-7713

Degree

PhD in comparative literature, Stanford University; BA, Emory University

Interests

  • Digital humanities, digital rhetorics, hacker culture, online privacy
  • Visual rhetoric, data visualization
  • Grammar. sentence diagramming
  • History & future of the book, typography, codicology, paleography
  • Comics studies, videogaming, game theory
  • Medieval linguistics and literature
  • Translation studies
  • Biblical rhetoric
  • Children's literature

Publications

  • “Wilfred Santiago and the Strategic Offense.” The Hooded Utilitarian, September 15, 2011
  • Review of Critical Approaches to Food in Children’s Literature (Keeling & Pollard, eds.).  Journal of Food, Culture, and Society, March 2010
  • “Survival of the Disciplines.” Inside Higher Education, February 12, 2010
  • “Can This Really Be the End? Nation, Salvation, Commodification, Preservation.”  Postscripts, January 2010
  • "Daniel the Dreamer, Daniel the Dream-Reader."  Dreams and Dream Visions, ed. Nancy Van Deusen, Brill, 2010
  • “It’s a Mole-Eat-Hare World: The Riverbank, the School, and the Colony,” in Kenneth Grahame’s Wind in the Willows: A Classic at 100, ed. Jacqueline Horne and Donna White, Children’s Literature Association, December 2009
  • "Using the Ormulum to Redefine Vernacularity." The Vulgar Tongues: Medieval and Postmedieval Vernacularity, ed. Nicholas Watson and Fiona Somerset, Penn State Press, 2003, pp. 1-23. [paperback edition, 2012]

Distinctions

  • Wig Distinguished Professorship for Excellence in Teaching, Pomona College, 2010
  • Mellon 8 Research/Teaching Partnership Grant, 2009 (declined)
  • Exchange Fellow, British Academy, 2007-08
  • Visiting Fellow at Downing College, Cambridge, 2008
  • National Humanities Center Summer Institute, 2007
  • Mellon Fellowship for the Humanities, 1995-1996