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Art and Art History

(For 2014–2015 academic year)

Professors Calo, Godfrey (Chair), Kaimal, Knecht, McVaugh, Schwarzer, Stephenson
Associate Professors Underhill, Wainwright
Assistant Professors Guile, Lane, Luthra, Marlowe, Shi
Visiting Assistant Professors Hackbarth
Lecturer Lorenz

The Department of Art and Art History offers courses of study in the history, theory, and practice of the visual arts for the general liberal arts student as well as the major in either art history or studio art.

Art History

The department offers more than 20 courses that trace the visual arts from antiquity to the present day. Class lectures are supplemented by visits to museums in the area and in New York City, as well as Colgate’s Clifford Gallery, Picker Art Gallery, and Longyear Museum. In this way, students increase their understanding of the visual arts as expressions of fundamental cultural values.

Studio Art

Courses in the practice of art provide instruction in drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, video art, printmaking, and digital art. These courses are designed to explore creative visual modes of expression and to help the student gain familiarity with contemporary issues in the visual arts. Studio practice is augmented by a lecture series, gallery exhibitions, film and video screenings, and guest artists.

The Clifford Gallery

This is a teaching gallery and features approximately six exhibitions a year. Exhibitions are selected by the art and art history faculty to provide examples of work executed in a variety of media that demonstrate issues originating in the academic curriculum. The primary focus is the display of professional work by contemporary artists. These artists are often featured in the weekly public lecture series. The Clifford Gallery is open to the entire community and contributes to the cultural life of the central New York area.

The Department of Art and Art History Lecture Series

Lectures take place every other week in Little Hall’s Golden Auditorium. The series features presentations by studio artists, art historians, and critics, and serves as an arena for discussion of a wide range of subjects relevant to the study of the visual arts. Recent participants have included art historians and practicing sculptors, painters, film and video makers, printmakers, photographers, architects, and artists working in digital art and performance. The series is required as part of the curriculum and is open to the community.

The Alternative Cinema Series

This series takes place weekly on Tuesday evenings. This is a series of films and videos ranging from “classic” cinema to the current avant garde. Each semester several film/video makers, historians, or curators visit campus and present work in person for the series.

Creative Arts House

The art and art history department joins with the English and music departments in sponsoring a college house devoted to promoting student activity in the arts.

The Picker Art Gallery

This professional gallery maintains the Colgate University collections, including some 11,000 works from a wide range of cultures and historical periods. Although it is not part of the Department of Art and Art History, the Picker Art Gallery provides an important resource to students, faculty, alumni, and friends of Colgate through exhibitions and sponsorship of the Friends of the Visual Arts.

The Longyear Museum of Anthropology

For a full description, please see "Sociology and Anthropology."

Pre-Architecture Preparation

Students anticipating graduate work in architecture should be aware that liberal arts experience is highly valued by the best graduate schools. To prepare for graduate work in architecture, it is essential to take PHYS 105 or PHYS 111 and one semester of calculus. Experience in studio courses, especially drawing (ARTS 211), sculpture (ARTS 263 or 264), and architecture studio (ARTS 271) is extremely valuable in the preparation of a graduate portfolio. The study of historical architecture and the ways in which architecture connects to society is promoted in many art courses such as ARTS 207, 210, 215, 216, 220, 226, 275, 277, 344, 360, and 372. Finally, experience in environmental studies courses is very relevant to graduate architectural applications work. Students interested in careers in architecture should contact the architecture adviser, Professor Carolyn Guile.

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Major Program

A student who completes the major program earns a degree in art and art history. A GPA of C (2.00) in combined studio courses and art history courses is required of all majors. Only one course below a C– will be accepted for the major.

All majors must meet one of the following sets of requirements:

Art History Emphasis

1. ARTS 100 and one 200-level studio art course.
2. Two 100-level art history courses.
3. Three 200- or 300-level art history courses.
4. Within the requirements 2 and 3 above, each student must take at least one course that addresses each of the following periods:
a. Art prior to 1300: 101, 103, 206, 207, 208, 210, 215, 244, 344
b. Art from 1300–1800: 102, 104, 210, 216, 220, 225, 226, 245, 246, 249, 311, 333, 360
c. Art after 1800: 106, 107, 234, 235, 236, 238, 239, 248, 250, 275, 277, 284, 287, 336, 338, 339, 370
5. One seminar in art history: ARTS 481, 482, 483, or 484. Students are strongly urged to fulfill the seminar requirement in their junior year and must fulfill it before spring of the senior year.
6. ARTS 474, Issues in Art History, to be taken in the fall of the senior year.
7. ARTS 475, Senior Thesis, to be taken in the spring of the senior year.
No more than one period requirement may be fulfilled by means of courses transferred in from an approved program, and no seminar may be taken outside Colgate.

Studio Arts Emphasis

1. ARTS 100, Introduction to Studio Art (prerequisite for all 200-level studio art courses).
2. Two 200-level studio art courses in different media.
3. One 300-level studio course (must be taken before the fall of the senior year).
4. ARTS 339, Art and Theory since 1960 (prerequisite for ARTS 405).
5. Two additional courses in art history in at least two different areas below. One may be at the 100 level if taken in the first two years.
a. Art prior to 1300: 101, 103, 206, 207, 208, 210, 215, 244, 344
b. Art from 1300 to 1800: 102, 104, 210, 216, 220, 225, 226, 245, 246, 249, 311, 333, 360
c. Art after 1800: 106, 107, 234 , 235, 236, 238, 239, 248, 250, 275, 277, 284, 287, 336, 338, 370
6. One elective course in studio at the 200 or 300 level.
7. ARTS 405, Issues in Recent Art, to be taken in the fall of the senior year.
8. ARTS 406, Senior Project, to be taken in the spring of the senior year.

Minor Program

Minor program in art and art history consists of six courses including at least two 100- or 200-level studio courses and at least two 200- or 300-level art history courses in two different periods:
a. Art prior to 1300: 101, 103, 206, 207, 208, 210, 215, 244, 344
b. Art from 1300 to 1800: 102, 104, 210, 216, 220, 225, 226, 245, 246, 249, 311, 333, 360
c. Art after 1800: 106, 107, 234, 235, 236, 238, 239, 248, 250, 275, 277, 284, 287, 336, 338, 339, 370
One 100-level art history survey may be counted if taken before the end of the sophomore year. No independent studies courses may be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the minor program.

Honors and High Honors

The award of honors in art and art history is dependent on departmental evaluation of work done as a senior project and the student’s GPA.
1. Senior Project: Every major undertakes a senior project (ARTS 406 or 475) in the spring of the senior year. Upon completion, the project may be nominated for departmental honors. If nominated, the project is prepared by the senior for public presentation. Following that presentation, faculty decide whether the project is worthy of honors. Honors will be conferred only on work of outstanding quality, while high honors will be awarded only to exceptional work of highest distinction.
a. Studio: The public presentation of studio work nominated for honors entails professionally exhibiting the work developed during the senior project. On the occasion of that exhibition, the student gives a gallery talk.
b. Art History: The public presentation of art historical work nominated for honors entails an illustrated lecture based on the research completed during the senior project.
2. GPA Requirements: Honors — 3.20 in courses within the department and 3.00 over-all; High Honors — 3.70 in courses within the department and 3.00 overall.

Awards

See “Honors and Awards: Art and Art History” in Chapter VI.

Advanced Placement and Transfer Credit

Advanced Placement (AP) is granted in art history and in studio art. Departmental credit for ARTS 102 is granted in art history for a score of 4 or 5 on the AP art history exam. Departmental credit for ARTS 100 may be granted for a score of 4 or 5 on both the AP studio art 2-D and 3-D design exams, subject to approval of the department based on a portfolio review. The portfolio must demonstrate competence in a variety of media and conceptual approaches. The department allows two courses to be transferred for credit toward the major, with prior approval of the courses by the department.

Study Groups

Students are encouraged to participate in study groups; they may not schedule off-campus study during the senior year. Study abroad must be scheduled around the seminar requirement in art history or the ARTS 339 requirement in studio art. For information, see "Off Campus Study Group Programs" in Chapter VI.

Course Offerings: Studio Arts

ARTS courses count toward the Human Thought and Expression area of inquiry requirement, unless otherwise noted.

100 Introduction to Studio Art
D. Godfrey, J. Knecht, P. Lane, L. Luthra, L. Schwarzer, W. Shi, L. Stephenson, L. Underhill
This course investigates the intellectual and theoretical aspects of art making as it explores the creative process of developing visual images and objects. Students work in various media addressing their applications to formal visual issues. The course introduces students to creative thinking, aspects of representation, expression, and critical method. Attendance is required at the weekly Department of Art and Art History visiting lecturer series. Open only to first-year students and sophomores, or by permission of instructor. The student’s cost for materials is $50–$100. This course is a prerequisite for all 200-level studio art courses.

201 Digital Studio: Animation, Image, and Sound Manipulation
W. Shi
An introduction to the computer as a medium for creating works of art. Each student completes a series of projects including digital print, animation, sound art, and interactive multimedia while learning the fundamentals of selected image and sound-processing programs. Completed projects are expected to reflect both rigorous concept development and technology proficiency. Students are encouraged to explore features of programs beyond the basics when necessary to individual project goals. The Little Hall Digital Studio is equipped with Macintosh computers. Previous Macintosh experience is helpful but not necessary. Prerequisite: ARTS 100.

202 Digital Studio: Making, Modeling, and Gaming
W. Shi
An introduction to software programming within the context of the arts. The course covers select relevant topics from a variety of current digital art practice. Such topics could include 3D modeling, gaming as a critical act, mapping, media archaeology, and digital interactions with the physical world or surrounding environment. The course selectively introduces students to widely used digital artist toolkits. Completed projects are expected to reflect both rigorous concept development and technology proficiency. Students are encouraged to explore features of programs beyond the basics when necessary to individual and group project goals. The Little Hall Digital Studio is equipped with Macintosh computers. Previous programming experience is helpful but not necessary. Pre-requisite: ARTS 100.

211 Drawing I
D. Godfrey, J. Knecht, L. Schwarzer, L. Stephenson
An introduction to drawing through a series of studio projects and slide lectures. The course addresses fundamental drawing skills and introduces a variety of media. The development of images is an integral aspect of the course. Observation, conceptualization, and expression are carefully considered. A variety of attitudes toward and approaches to drawings are examined. Both contemporary and historic work are included in this process. The student’s cost for materials is about $100. Seniors may take this course only with permission of instructor. Prerequisite: ARTS 100.

221 Video Art I
P. Lane
An introduction to the history, theory, and practice of video as a fine arts medium. Foundational skills in camera, lighting, sound, editing, and web publishing are introduced in hands-on labs and further developed through a series of video art production assignments, culminating in a final project. Students learn not only the technical skills required for video production, but how to engage with the form critically and creatively as they develop their artistic practice. Class time is divided between screenings, discussions, labs, and critique of student work. Equipment is provided by the department. Prerequisite: ARTS 100.

231 Painting I
L. Stephenson
An introduction to the study and practice of painting. Problems related to composition and the formal properties peculiar to this medium are investigated through both prescribed and self-directed studio assignments. Questions related to content and subject matter are explored in studio, class lectures, critiques, and visits by outside lecturers who share their professional expertise in studio art, art history, and art criticism. The student’s cost for materials is $150–$350. Seniors may take this course only with permission of instructor. Prerequisite: ARTS 100.

241 Photography I
L. Luthra
An introduction to photography, this course covers use of the camera, exposure, film development, printing processes, and presentation. The orientation is toward photography as a creative medium; attention is given to form and concept as well as to technical quality. The student must provide a camera (35mm) with focusing, aperture, and shutter speed adjustments, and a light meter. The student’s cost for materials is $300–$500. Seniors may take this course only with permission of instructor. Prerequisite: ARTS 100.

251 Printmaking I
L. Schwarzer
This course introduces a range of printmaking media: intaglio printing, relief printing, computer graphics, and lithography. Students are expected to develop a series of prints using the graphic medium of printmaking. Studio research should reflect an understanding of formal visual issues as well as a carefully considered individual approach to the projects introduced in class. Technical proficiency in the methods of printmaking introduced in the course is also expected. Historical and contemporary prints introduce a range of aesthetic concerns. The student’s cost for materials is about $150. Seniors may take this course only with permission of instructor. Prerequisite: ARTS 100.

263 Sculpture: Surface and Form
D. Godfrey
This course introduces, through a series of directed projects, basic sculptural concepts and processes, both analog and digital, in a contemporary critical context. There is a focus on understanding form and space through direct modeling, digital design and scanning, 3D printing, moldmaking, and additive techniques. Seniors by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: ARTS 100.

264 Sculpture: Material and Process
D. Godfrey
This course introduces, through a series of directed projects, basic sculptural concepts and processes, both analog and digital, in a contemporary critical context. There is a focus on a range of processes — construction, casting, welding, digital design, 3D printing — and materials — wood, plaster, metal, and plastics. Seniors by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: ARTS 100.

271 Architectural Design I
Staff
This studio-based course introduces students to the basic elements of architectural research and design. Beginning with basic exercises in the construction and arrangement of all given shapes, students progress to increasingly more complex design challenges. They learn about programming, circulation, structure, and form in architecture. Design exercises are accompanied by regular lectures on relevant techniques and problems in architecture. Most importantly, students are challenged to address the social implications of the design factors and skills they focus on in this course. Priority is given to juniors, seniors, and students majoring in art and art history. Prerequisite: ARTS 100.

302 Digital Studio II
W. Shi
Digital Studio II builds on the aesthetic investigations and technical skills introduced in ARTS 201 or ARTS 202. Discussion, critical reading, and evaluation of contemporary works are incorporated into the course. Students create advanced works of art that demonstrate a significantly more sophisticated use of both theoretical and technical aspects of digital art. All equipment is provided by the department. Prerequisite: ARTS 201 or ARTS 202.

312 Drawing II
L. Schwarzer
The fundamental skills and the various approaches introduced in ARTS 211 form the basis for ARTS 312. Additional modes of expression, approaches to image making, and drawing technique are introduced. Working at this level presupposes a willingness to synthesize information and work with more sophisticated problems and solutions. Slide lectures, discussions, and individual research are incorporated into the class. Sustained energy and commitment are expected, as is the continued development of a personal aesthetic. The student’s cost for the materials is $150. Prerequisite: ARTS 211.

322 Video Art II
P. Lane
This course is an extension of ARTS 221. Students are expected to make one or two works of art in video. These individual projects should reflect, upon completion, a level of sophistication that supersedes the project executed in ARTS 221. All equipment is provided by the department. All students enrolled in the course are required to attend the Tuesday evening Alternative Cinema series. Prerequisite: ARTS 221.

332 Painting II
L. Stephenson
This course is a continuation of ARTS 231 and is designed for the advanced study of painting. The class is directed through assigned projects, lectures, and independent studio hours, and is supported by individual and group critiques. Directed assignments develop increased technical proficiency and an understanding of formal issues of painting, while research and experimentation in both traditional and nontraditional media aid students in the process of defining a conceptual focus and refining a body of work based on these ideas. The student’s cost for materials is $150–$300. Prerequisite: ARTS 231.

342 Photography II
L. Luthra
This is an intermediate-level course in photography that includes lecture-demonstrations, discussions, critiques, and studio, field, and lab work. Assignments are structured to reinforce foundations and introduce color material as well as specialized techniques in image control and manipulation. The course enables and encourages the student to use the camera and photographic processes and imagery as investigation and expression. Integration of a sophisticated conceptual framework with technical skills and a personal vision is encouraged. The student’s cost for materials is $300–$500. Prerequisite: ARTS 241.

354 Printmaking II
L. Schwarzer
Offering continued work in printmaking, this class requires sustained energy and commitment to a printmaking technique. The development of individual images is a primary factor. The student’s personal interpretation of the medium is investigated in a more sophisticated manner, and the problems and solutions explored reflect the advanced nature of the class. Students are encouraged to develop a suite of prints. New technical information is introduced periodically. Contemporary and historic prints and attitudes toward printmaking are discussed in slide lectures. The student’s cost for materials is $150–$200. Prerequisite: ARTS 251.

364 Sculpture II
D. Godfrey
As an intermediate-level offering, this course introduces the use of a more advanced range of conceptual and technical tools involved in the making of sculpture. Seminar discussions on selected readings and group and private critiques encourage the student to attain greater independence in the execution of assigned projects. The student’s cost for materials is about $175–$200, which includes a required $100 lab fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 263 or ARTS 264.

405 Issues in Recent Art
D. Godfrey
This is a course in interpretation and criticism of contemporary art, with particular attention paid to the impact of social and political events on the visual arts. A wide range of media is examined, including painting, sculpture, film, video, performance, conceptual, and post-conceptual art. All majors with a studio emphasis are required to take ARTS 405, which must be completed prior to enrolling in ARTS 406. It is also open to non-majors with permission of instructor. Offered fall term only. Prerequisite: ARTS 339.

406 Senior Project: Studio Art
D. Godfrey
The student works closely with a faculty member to develop and realize a body of studio work suitable for presentation that serves as a capstone for the major. Students meet twice a week as a group to critique work in progress. These critiques are led by the senior projects professor and include the critical language acquired during the previous term in ARTS 405. Work from the project is shown as part of a senior exhibition at the end of the term, and nominations for departmental honors are based on the quality of the work done. All majors with a studio arts emphasis are required to take and complete ARTS 406 in the spring of the senior year. Prerequisite: major in studio arts, ARTS 405, or permission of instructor. Offered spring term only.

291, 391, 491 Independent Study
Staff
The department offers intensive work to qualified sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Appropriate background and permission of instructor are required.

Course Offerings: Art History

101 A Survey of Western Art to the 14th Century
E. Marlowe
This course traces art from the prehistoric period to the Early Renaissance in Europe and the Middle East with emphasis on both style and cultural context. The arts of ancient Egypt, Greece, Rome, Islam, and the Middle Ages are included. This is also an introduction to the discipline of art history, training students for more advanced art history courses by teaching basic vocabulary and techniques of close looking and analytical thinking about visual material. Open to first-year students and sophomores, or by permission of instructor.

102 Survey of Western Art from the Revival of Antiquity to Revolution
C. Guile
This is a survey of Western art from the beginnings of the European engagement with Greco-Roman antique heritage as well as the pictorial exploration of naturalism, through the establishment of art academies to codify traditions and modes of representation, to the attempts to overturn tradition and canon during the era of revolution. Students view pan-European works from the Renaissance, Baroque, and Neoclassical periods. The course is also an introduction to the discipline of art history, training students for more advanced art history courses by teaching basic vocabulary and techniques of close looking and analytical thinking about visual material.

103 The Arts of Asia before 1300
P. Kaimal
This course introduces students to the methods of art history through the architecture and sculpture of ancient Asia, from prehistory to the 13th century in places now called Afghanistan, China, Cambodia, India, Iran, Iraq, Japan, Korea, Indonesia, Pakistan, and Saudi Arabia. Lectures, discussions, and readings proceed in roughly chronological order, paying special attention to cultural concepts that flow and morph across Asia, such as Buddhism and Hinduism. Student work concentrates on the fundamental skills for more advanced art history courses: close and analytical looking, articulating visual responses through language, and understanding how historical and cultural contexts can shape the ways people make and see art.

104 The Arts of Asia since 1300
P. Kaimal
This course introduces students to the methods of art history through the architecture, paintings, gardens, and cities of Asia, from the 13th century to the 19th century in places now called Afghanistan, China, India, Iran, Japan, Korea, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, and Uzbekistan. Lectures, discussions, and readings proceed in roughly chronological order, paying special attention to cultural concepts that flow and morph across Asia, such as Islam, the Mongols, and imperialisms of recent centuries. Student work concentrates on the fundamental skills for more advanced art history courses: close and analytical looking, articulating visual responses through language, and understanding how historical and cultural contexts can shape the ways people make and see art.

106 Art of the United States
M.A. Calo
This course is a selective survey of American art from the 17th century to World War II. Emphasis is placed on artistic development in the United States as a function of political, economic, and social change from the founding of the nation through the Depression. The course considers primarily painting and sculpture, with some discussion of photography and architecture. It also serves as a basic introduction to the analytical tools and approaches that distinguish art history as an academic discipline.

107 Survey of Western Art from the Age of Revolution to the Present
M.A. Calo, D. Hackbarth, R. McVaugh
This is a selective survey of Western art from the turn of the 19th century to the present. Major representative works are considered and students develop an understanding of artistic periods, including Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, and Modernism. The course is also an introduction to the discipline of art history, training students for more advanced art history courses by teaching basic vocabulary and techniques of close looking and analytical thinking about visual material.

207 Roman Art
E. Marlowe
This course introduces students to some of the riches of Roman material culture, including painting, sculpture, architecture, coinage, and urbanism, from the 6th century BCE to the 6th century CE. Despite this broad timeframe, the aim is not exhaustive chronological coverage. Rather, the course focuses on the social and political contexts that generated the production of artworks in the Roman world. Students explore the question of how these works’ formal qualities met the needs of ancient consumers.

208 Barbarians and Empires

E. Marlowe
A study of art and architecture in Western Europe and the Mediterranean world from the origins of Christianity to the late 11th century. Themes include the heritage of classical art, its transformation through contact with northern barbarian culture, its survival in the Byzantine Greek Empire, and the imperial art of the new northern Holy Empire.

210 Art and Architecture of the Islamic World
E. Marlowe
This course considers major developments in Islamic arts and architecture from the 7th through the 18th centuries, and includes the Islamic contact with Europe. The first half of the course deals with the period prior to the Mongol invasions; the second half of the course emphasizes the period from the early 13th century, when Iran became the center of artistic production in the Islamic world, to the time of the European conquests in the early 19th century.

215 Age of Cathedrals
E. Marlowe
This course looks at architecture, sculpture, and painting (including manuscript illumination and stained glass) in their historical context. Themes include monastic cloisters, pilgrimage and crusade, the construction of Gothic cathedrals, the emergence of an urban middle class, castles, and courtly love.

216 Southern European Renaissance Art

C. Guile
This course considers painting and sculpture of Southern Europe ca. 1400–1575, examining major artists and regional practices within their social, political, and cultural settings. Themes include the development of linear perspective, the inheritance and interpretation of classical tradition, technologies of art, Renaissance “self-fashioning,” and narrative strategy as approached through visual analysis, primary source readings, and recent critical literature.

220 Renaissance and Baroque Architecture
C. Guile
European architectural history and theory ca. 1400–1750. Through the categories of typology, morphology, theory, and site, the course examines major monuments and monument complexes in their social, political, and cultural settings. Recommended for students wishing to prepare themselves for advanced studies in architecture. Geographic focus varies across semesters and includes Southern Europe, East-Central Europe, Northern Europe, and European colonies.

225 Renaissance and Reformation in Northern Europe
E. Marlowe
A study of painting, sculpture, manuscripts, and prints of the 15th and 16th centuries produced in the Low Countries, Germany, and France. The course concentrates on style developments and the changing religious and social context of works of art. Themes explored include the emergence of panel painting, new forms of devotional imagery, the role of symbols in the art of Van Eyck and Bosch, the impact of the Protestant Reformation, cross-influences between northern Europe and the Italian Renaissance, and the roles of Dürer, Holbein, and Brueghel in creating the humanistic Renaissance of the 16th century.

226 Baroque Art
C. Guile
European painting and sculpture ca. 1575–1800 in its cultural, political, and social settings. Themes include the impact of the Counter-Reformation on the visual arts; Caravaggio and international Caravaggism; “realism” and “verisimilitude”; the intersection of mysticism, spirituality, and art; art and science; theatricality; art as propaganda.

234 American Art and Culture between World Wars
M.A. Calo
This course examines American visual culture and ideology from 1920 to 1940. In particular, it explores issues of modernity, nationalism, race, and cultural identity as they emerge in painting and sculpture, with related consideration of music and film. Visual artistic production is weighed against a select group of critical and literary texts that address similar concerns. Emphasis is placed on major movements and broad cultural tendencies such as art in the Machine Age, the Harlem Renaissance, the American Scene Movement, the cultural politics of the Popular Front, the New Deal, and the Federal Art Projects.

235 Art and Nationalism in 19th Century America
M.A. Calo
This is a selective survey of American 19th century art with an emphasis on impulses towards cultural nationalism and the establishment of American identity. The course examines the desire and impact of American artists who sought to assert cultural independence from Europe in the wake of the achievement of American political independence. Topics that are considered in detail include: history painting and democracy; wilderness ideology, manifest destiny and the American landscape; the myth of the American frontier; genre painting and American exceptionalism; the artistic representation of native peoples and African Americans; the gendering of American culture and identity; representations of progress, expansionism, and material prosperity.

236 European Realism and Impressionism
R. McVaugh
Realist and Impressionist tendencies shaped European art from the 1820s to 1880. Artists engaged everyday life in an environment transformed by industrialization, urbanization, and imperialism. Scientific developments prompted revaluations of traditional humanism, and artistic institutions responded to an expanding public. Finally, the crystallization of nationalism impinged on artistic subjects and audience. Artists from Daumier and Menzel to Monet, Morisot, and Whistler offer the framework for our study of European art of the period.

238 Early European Modernism: Post Impressionism to Abstraction
M.A. Calo, D. Hackbarth, R. McVaugh
This is a survey of major artistic movements in Western Europe from 1880–1920. The course examines problems of representation, abstraction, and modernism as they are exemplified primarily in painting and sculpture, with some consideration of photography, film, and the graphic arts. Artists include Cezanne, Rodin, Gauguin, Van Gogh, Picasso, Kandinsky, Matisse, and Duchamp.

239 Western Painting and Sculpture 1920–1960
M.A. Calo, D. Hackbarth, R. McVaugh
World war, totalitarianism, and revolution form the backdrop for this study of art and artists in Europe and the United States during the middle of the 20th century. The course begins with an examination of the challenges to rationalism raised by the Dada and Surrealists groups in the context of World War I and its aftermath. The course also considers the so-called “Return to Order” that coalesced as a reaction to the shifting political landscape of the interwar years. The reemergence and eventual dominance of abstract painting at mid-century is considered in relation to the theoretical formation of modernist criticism and the tensions of the Cold War.

244 Temples, Caves, and Stupas (The Art of India before 1300)
P. Kaimal
This course begins with South Asia’s most ancient civilization (ca. 2500 BCE) and then tracks the classic forms of Buddhist stupas, rock-cut cave temples, early mosques, and the increasingly grand stone temples dedicated to the worship of Hindu gods. Elegant figures, carved in an aesthetic language that persists in Indian dance, guide visitors through these monuments, teaching them about the nature of the divine. Special attention in this course is devoted to analyzing elements that lend South Asian art its distinctive character.

245 Palaces and Paintings (The Art of India since 1300)
P. Kaimal
As South Asian temple complexes expand, they become entire cities and they share the form of kings’ palatial fort-complexes. Expanding outward in concentric rings from their sacred, private cores, these temples and palaces, as well as garden-tombs and houses of government for the British Raj, create visions of divine transcendence on earth, transformative spaces where every visitor has a chance to engage with the ultimate order of creation. This course also explores the paintings made for the people who inhabited these palaces, with special attention to delicate Mughal portraits, impassioned love lyrics favored by Rajput princes, and spaces magically transformed by the presence of the sacred — Hindu, Jain, Buddhist, and Muslim. Special attention in this course is devoted to analyzing elements that lend South Asian art its distinctive character.

246 Pictures in China and Japan
P. Kaimal
A focus on East Asia’s pictorial arts — especially paintings and prints, but also film and new media — from prehistoric times through the 21st century. This chronological survey begins with China, switches to Japan after the mid-term break, and spends the last few classes comparing these regions and taking a longer view of each. Student work focuses upon close analysis of visual materials and scholarly essays, and on the challenges of integrating visual and verbal information. No prerequisites, but previous coursework in art history or Asian studies is helpful.

248 African Art
C.A. Lorenz
A study of the principal art styles of sub-Saharan Africa, this course gives attention to both the formal and cultural aspects of indigenous art. The manufacture and usage of art objects is examined within the contexts of local religious, social, and political systems, as well as within the larger framework of language and cultural areas. Traditional art styles are analyzed as products of both collective aesthetics and individual innovation. Attention is given to transmission of art forms from culture to culture and to the persistence of traditional art in the face of social change. This course is crosslisted as ANTH 248.

249 Art and Architecture of the Ancient Americas
C.A. Lorenz
This course examines the principal art styles of the pre-Columbian cultures of South and Middle America, while also considering their impact on the art of indigenous cultures of North America. Relying on archaeological and art historical sources, students discover the usefulness of art and architecture in reconstructing the cultures of the pre-Columbian past. The course also considers the relationship of art and architecture to the environment; the effects of migration, trade, warfare, and technological innovation on the development of art styles; and the use of art in maintaining social hierarchies, political institutions, and religious systems. This course is crosslisted as ANTH 249.

250 Native Art of North America
C.A. Lorenz
Relying on archaeological, art historical, and ethnographic sources, this course examines the principal art styles of the indigenous cultures of North America. The course explores such issues as the usefulness of art objects in reconstructing cultures of the past and as historical documents for living peoples; gender roles in art production; the relationship between art, technology, and utility; the use of art as educational tools, memory aids, and religious devices; the relative importance of tradition and innovation; and the role of contemporary art in Native North American life today. This course is crosslisted as ANTH 250.

275 American Campus Architecture
R. McVaugh
The American campus, a distinctive planning and architectural tradition, is the focus of this course. In the course of its study, students gain an overview of the evolution of American architecture from the colonial period to the present. Emphasis is on stylistic evolution of structures and the accommodation of shifting educational priorities in campus organization and planning. Analysis of the Colgate campus and its history is part of the course.

277 Modern Architecture
R. McVaugh
This course studies the emergence of a self-consciously modern architecture in European and the United States at the turn of the 20th century, follow its maturation in the inter-war period, and explore its international proliferation following World War II. Students become familiar with many key buildings and architects as well as the theory associated with them.

284 History and Theory of Photography
Staff
A survey of the history of photography from its beginnings in the first half of the 19th century to the present. This course considers the photography in terms of cultural, scientific, aesthetic, and theoretical issues.

285 New Media Art: History and Theory
Staff
This course examines the origins and history of New Media Art. Consideration is given to the social conditions and Modernism and the avant-garde art movements of the 20th century that helped determine and shape cultural and artistic approaches to art and technology. Emphasis is given to theories about the ways that photography, cinema, video, and the computer inform contemporary art-making practices, and in turn, how digital media and the Internet are challenging the concepts and traditional processes of photography, film, performance, and video art.

287 History and Theory of the Cinema
Staff
This survey of the history of cinema examines all aspects of filmmaking, the development of cinematic language, and film theory in relation to intellectual thought in the 20th century. Emphasis is on the development of film analysis as well as individual visual thinking. All students enrolled in the course are required to attend the Tuesday evening Alternative Cinema series.

311 The Arts in Venice during the Golden Age
This course is crosslisted as MUSI 311. For course description, see "Music: Course Offerings"; Major credit by permission of the department.

333 The Origins of the Renaissance
Staff
The Italian Renaissance traces its origins to the birth of a mercantile urban society during the late Middle Ages, and to deep and pervasive artistic contacts with the Greek Byzantine civilization to the east. This course explores the art and architecture of the later 13th and 14th centuries (the duecento and trecento in Italian art), looking closely at urban churches, town halls, and civic patronage of religious art and architecture to identify what they reflect of a newly vibrant, middle-class secular culture.

336 Romantic Artists and Their Art
R. McVaugh
David, Kauffmann, Goya, Blake, Turner, Constable, Friedrich, Canova, Gericault, Delacroix. The era from the French Revolution to the Revolutions of 1848 witnessed the maturation of an extraordinary group of complex artists struggling with the social and technological challenge of the Industrial Revolution, the spiritual challenge of emergent empiricism, and the passions of modern nationalism. During these years many of the modern characteristics of the modern artist were formed as was the modern audience for art.

338 American Art and Culture during the Gilded Age
M.A. Calo
The Civil War, Reconstruction, immigration, and industrial development form the backdrop for this investigation into American culture during the so-called Gilded Age. Major artistic figures of this era such as Winslow Homer, Thomas Eakins, James A. M. Whistler, Mary Cassatt, John Singer Sargent, and Henry O. Tanner are considered in the context of an evolving cultural climate shaped by late Victorian social ideology, shifting constructs of racial and gender identity, the growth of capitalism, the loss of American innocence, and the impact of diverse ideas from Darwinism to aestheticism.

339 Art and Theory since 1960
M.A. Calo, Staff
This course is a survey of international art movements since 1960 that questioned the definition of art, the status of the art object, and the role of the artist in the late 20th century. The concepts of modernism and postmodernism serve as points of departure for consideration of evolving modes of production and interpretation in art and criticism. Varied theoretical paradigms that have informed artistic practice since 1960 are examined in the context of rapid and radical social change, the emergence of new media, the pressures of mass culture on the visual arts, the breakdown of conventional artistic boundaries, and the explosive growth of the art market. The course concludes with an examination of the impact on the arts of post-colonial thinking and identity politics at the end of the century.

344 Hindu Temples: Architecture and Sculpture, Architecture as Sculpture
P. Kaimal
From rock-cut halls carved into cliffs to elaborately ornamented constructions with multiple interior spaces, the buildings that have housed worship of the Goddess, Shiva, Vishnu, and other deities of the Hindu pantheon honor the ideals of the divine palace and of the silent caves embedded in a mountain. This course explores what characteristics the wide range of Hindu temples share, how they vary from one region to another, and how they changed from the 3rd century BCE to 12th century CE. What do they share with structures for Buddhist, Jaina, and Muslim worship? How did ritual shape buildings and sculpture, and can we reconstruct ritual from material remains?

351 Women and Art
Staff
This course examines issues in the visual arts from the point of view of gender. Emphasis is placed on the extent to which the social history of women has determined the choice of art as a profession, the imaging of women, and the interpretation of art.

360 Borderlands
C. Guile
This course examines the form and transmission of art and architecture in the eastern and southeastern borderlands of Europe from the 15th through the early 19th centuries. By focusing on early modern “cultural fault lines” between east and west, students study the ways in which traditions and identities particular to the area shaped visual expression. The course draws on examples chiefly from within the former Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, the Kingdom of Bohemia, the Holy Roman Empire, and the Venetian Republic. Students seek to understand what is particular about the arts and architecture in the borderlands, and by extension the impact of geography on visual culture.

370 Museums
E. Marlowe, Staff
Museums are didactic institutions which manifest implicit judgments about the structure of history and the value of culture. They are also political institutions, responsive to the priorities of the municipalities and private patrons that support them. In this course, students gain insight into the professional practices of museums, as well as their identity as cultural institutions that operate for the public good.

372 Great Cities: Urban Form and Meaning

D. Hackbarth, E. Marlowe
Cities function as series of forms and spaces that direct people’s movements and states of mind. Some urban forms arise unplanned, from patterns of usage and individual need. Some are planned to produce specific kinds of impact. Sometimes those plans succeed; always they remain to some degree unfinished. In all cases, the spatial arrangements of cities tell important stories that we cannot help but experience and that we can learn to understand. Each offering of the course focuses on a single city, such as London or Rome. Prerequisite: one 100- or 200-level art history course.

381, 382 Topics in Art History
Staff
This is an umbrella course designed to allow the department to better utilize the expertise of its visiting Batza chairs and other visiting staff. The course explores specialized themes as they relate to the art of diverse cultures, geographical areas, and/or historical periods, depending on the interest of the visiting faculty.

474 Issues in Art History
C. Guile
This course introduces students to the demands of advanced art-historical study through critical engagement with the methods employed by art historians working today. It also considers analytical approaches utilized by some of the founding figures of the discipline. The course is required of all senior art and art history majors. Offered fall term only. Prerequisite: one 400-level art history seminar.

475 Senior Project: Art History
C. Guile
The student works closely with a faculty member to develop and complete a substantive independent research paper. Nominations for departmental honors are based on the quality of the work. All majors with an art history or architectural studies emphasis are required to take and complete ARTS 475 in the spring of their senior year. Open to majors only. Offered in the spring term only.

481 Seminar in Art Prior to 1300
P. Kaimal, E. Marlowe
Prerequisite: appropriate 200- or 300-level course or permission of instructor.

482 Seminar in Art 1300 to 1800
C. Guile, P. Kaimal, C.A. Lorenz
Prerequisite: appropriate 200- or 300-level course or permission of instructor.

483 Seminar in Art after 1800
M.A. Calo, D. Hackbarth, R. McVaugh
Prerequisite: appropriate 200- or 300-level course or permission of instructor.

484 Seminar on Topical Theme in Art
Staff
Prerequisite: appropriate 200- or 300-level course or permission of instructor.

291, 391, 491 Independent Study
Staff
The department offers intensive work to qualified sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Appropriate background plus permission of instructor is required.